Don’t Leave Fall Nitrogen Unstable

In the field applying nutrients

Nutrient management is as important in fall as it is at planting.

Growers considering a fall anhydrous ammonia application can take measures to make the most out of their fertilizer investment, while supporting nitrogen management best practices, says Eric Scherder, Ph.D., field scientist, Dow AgroSciences.

“Nitrogen isn’t a one-time event,” Scherder says. “There has to be forethought about how to manage it today and tomorrow.”

Growers who are serious about reducing nitrate loss into groundwater can take steps when making fall applications. These steps include evaluating application methods, paying attention to temperature and using a nitrogen stabilizer to reduce nitrate loss due to leaching and denitrification.

Important Considerations Before Fall Application

Soil Temp at 50 degrees or lessThere are best management practices growers can follow this fall to optimize fertilizer applications.

In the fall, let temperature drive timing. Fall nitrogen applications should be based on soil temperature, not calendar date, Scherder says. Wait to apply nitrogen until soil temperatures drop below 50 F.

Nitrosomonas bacteria, which converts ammonium nitrogen to the nitrate form that’s susceptible to loss, are active until soils reach freezing temperatures; however, their activity is significantly reduced once soil temperatures drop below 50 degrees,” Scherder says. “This is important to consider when making fall applications to protect that investment.”

To learn more about nutrient management visit with our agronomy team today.

Balancing Grain Drying and Propane Storage Needs

Right-size your propane tank

The 2016 harvest season has been one for the books with the USDA expecting farmers to harvest record amounts of corn and soybeans. These record yields highlight the fact that modern farming operations are bigger than ever – both in acreage and bushels.

During the busiest times of harvest, the number one question farmers ask themselves is how much crop they can take off each day – and if they have the appropriate resources to dry and store it. A cool, wet and windy fall has resulted in farmers harvesting corn at higher, moister levels than originally anticipated. This has increased pressure on grain dryers and localized propane supplies.

Although the last few weeks of harvest can be hectic, it is also the best time to evaluate how efficiently grain is moving through your operation and identify any areas that might need improvements in 2017.

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CHS posts fiscal 2016 earnings of $424.2 million

ST. PAUL, MINN. (Nov. 3, 2016) – CHS Inc., the nation’s leading farmer-owned cooperative and a global energy, grains and foods company, today announced earnings for fiscal 2016 of $424.2 million.

CHS net income for fiscal 2016 (Sept. 1, 2015 – Aug. 31, 2016) of $424.2 million was down 46 percent from $781.0 million for fiscal 2015, reflecting lower pre-tax earnings within the company’s Energy and Ag segments, as well as its Corporate and Other category. Lower pre-tax earnings within these two segments were partly offset by increased pretax earnings in its Foods segment, and seven months of earnings from its Nitrogen Production segment which was created by the February 2016 strategic investment CHS made in CF Industries Nitrogen, LLC (CF Nitrogen). These results reflect the continued economic down cycle in the company’s core energy and agriculture businesses, as well as the impact of one-time events.

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To our patrons

THANK YOU to all our patrons for continuing to support CHS Marshall Regional. As we move forward with harvest we would like to thank all our patrons for their commitment to our local coop. We wish everyone a safe and bountiful finish to the 2016 harvest.

CHS Equity Redemption

CHS Board addresses 2016 equity management; delays individual equity redemption program changes

 The CHS Board has delayed implementation of the company’s new individual equity redemption program, a decision made following its regular review of the CHS equity management program.

“This decision was made as we considered a number of factors, including our commitment to balance sheet management and the current economic cycle,” says CHS Board Chairman Dave Bielenberg. “CHS remains financially sound and profitable, but as we navigate this economic cycle, the board believes this delay was appropriate as we continue to take a long-term view in managing equity redemptions.”

When effective, the new program would add “age of equity” distribution like that now used for member cooperatives to the existing “age of producer” program. It had been set to take effect with redemptions made based on individuals’ fiscal 2016 (Sept. 1, 2015 – Aug. 31, 2016) business with CHS. It is now slated to take effect for fiscal 2017 (Sept. 1, 2016 – Aug. 31, 2017) business and will affect distributions taking place in fiscal 2018, although the board will continue to evaluate this timing as part of its overall equity management review.

In the meantime, CHS will continue to redeem 100 percent of individual equity upon request to producers age 70 or older and to estates. As previously announced, producers who have already received a full equity redemption at age 70 will receive any future patronage distributions as 40 percent cash and 60 percent equity.

While specific amounts of patronage distributions and equity redemptions will be reported after CHS reports fiscal 2016 results in November, Bielenberg adds that the company intends to return 40 percent of patronage earnings in cash. He also notes that CHS will not issue non-qualified equity for fiscal 2016 and will pass through unused portions of the company’s Section 199 domestic production deduction (DPAD) to eligible owners.

To date, CHS has redeemed previously earned member cooperative equity through a portion of 2006, well ahead of the CHS Board’s goal of maintaining age of equity at about 15 years and a significant improvement from age of equity at 40 years earlier this decade.

In addition, the CHS Board has also determined that the company will return 40 percent of fiscal 2016 patronage earnings to eligible member cooperatives in cash. The company will not issue non-qualified equity for fiscal 2016 and will pass through unused portions of its fiscal 2016 Section 199 domestic production deduction (DPAD) to eligible owners.

 

Bean Program changes

Effective 10/18/16, All CHS Marshall grain locations will only be accepting beans 13% and lower.   With elevator capacity filling up our only outlet is the rail market and they have a strict 13% policy.  We want to insure we make grades and due to that we will be unable to accept any beans in excess off 13% for the remainder of harvest.  Please call either myself or our General Manager with questions, our numbers are listed below.

Joel Wiering                                                                          Kent Mulder
CHS Marshall Regional Grain Department Manager                  CHS Marshall Regional General Manager
Office: 507-658-3450                                                              Office: 507-532-3246

CHS Pro Advantage contract now signing up bushels for 2017, 2018

Corn field - commoditiesWhen commodity markets turn volatile, pulling the trigger gets tougher. Grain producers looking for a seamless way to diversify – and simplify – their marketing have one more choice with CHS Pro Advantage.

This contract allows a grower to pledge a specific quantity of bushels to be professionally priced over a specific period of time, essentially taking the emotion out of selling. Bushels are priced by the trading professionals at CHS Hedging-owned Russell Consulting Group.

“The 2016 crop year was our inaugural offering for CHS Pro Advantage and we saw a tremendous interest from farmers who wanted to take advantage of pricing by experts who have a track record of success,” says John Whittle, merchandiser, CHS Grain Marketing NA.

“It’s important to remember the basis decision remains with the grower,” says Kent Beadle, marketing manager, Russell Consulting Group. “The settlement price to the grower is based on the performance of the futures and options hedges traded by our licensed brokers.”

Contract participants receive regular email updates about marketing progress and there is a price-out option available at any time during the pricing period.

Enrollment for CHS Pro Advantage corn, soybean and spring wheat bushels is now through Dec. 14, 2016. With one and two-year sign-ups, growers can enroll 2017 as well as 2018 bushels. Contact your local grain merchandiser for more details. Remember, there is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options.

Harvest hours updates

Our grain receiving hours will change with the weather so please use the “HARVEST HOURS” tab at the top of the home page or call:

Ruthton 507-658-3450, Tracy 507-629-3780, Elkton 605-542-2371, Marshall 507-532-3246

© 2019 CHS Inc.